The Price Is Wrong — Trump’s Health Secretary Is a Bad Sign for Health Reform

[This column was printed today on Commonwealth Magazine’s website.]

PRESIDENT-ELECT DONALD TRUMP has nominated Rep. Tom Price of George, an orthopedic surgeon and the House Budget Committee chairman, to be his first secretary of health and human services. For those lulled into believing that Trump was moderating his views on the Affordable Care Act because of recent statements on 60 Minutes that he leaned toward supporting ACA provisions on banning pre-existing condition requirements and allowing young adults to stay on their parents’ insurance plans, this nomination is a bucket of ice cold water.

UNITED STATES - APRIL 16: Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., right, Chairman of the House Budget Committee, and Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., prepare for a hearing in Cannon Building titled "The President's FY2014 Revenue and Economic Policy Proposals," featuring testimony by Treasury Secretary Jack Lew. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES – APRIL 16: Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., right, Chairman of the House Budget Committee, and Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., prepare for a hearing  titled “The President’s FY2014 Revenue and Economic Policy Proposals,” . (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Price, a leading member of the House GOP’s “doctor caucus,” and a founding member of the Tea Party caucus, has been a strident ACA critic from the start, issuing and reissuing his own ACA replacement plan – the “Empowering Patients First Act” – on several occasions. He has carved a role as House Speaker Paul Ryan’s strongest ally in proposing a radical reconstruction not just of the ACA but of the entire US health security landscape, seeking not just to obliterate President Obama’s health legacy, but also that of President Lyndon Johnson, who signed Medicare and Medicaid into law way back in 1965.

The Ryan-Price agenda includes four key components:

  1. As far as possible, repealing the ACA’s private health insurance and Medicaid coverage expansions, along with most of the new taxes that finance them;
  2. Reengineering the Medicare program into “premium support” in which enrollees will receive fixed dollar vouchers to purchase health insurance policies;
  3. Reconstructing Medicaid into a “per capita allotment” financing model to drastically limit federal dollars to state governments that would be incentivized to limit eligibility and benefits to low income enrollees while increasing cost sharing; and
  4. Capping the federal employer health insurance tax deduction that would sharply increase insurance costs for workers and their employers.

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